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All the OpenWorld 2019 downloads!

Why dig around for hours in the catalog? Here are all of the downloads registered in the OpenWorld catalog!

You can pick and choose from the list below, or if you want a CURL script that will download the entire set, you can find that here. Enjoy!

BOF1167 Java on Azure BOF,Reza Rahman

BOF1321 Why You Should Be Coding with the NetBeans IDE,Mark Stephens

BOF1336 How to Improve the Quality of Your Application (I Wish I’d Known This Earlier!),Ioannis Kolaxis

Then OpenWorld mega-list

You’ve been to OpenWorld…

You’ve seen the great content…

Networked with the community…

But now you want to keep the ball rolling and catch up with the speakers on twitter.

So here is the mega-twitter list…all the speakers from OpenWorld and CodeOne that provided their twitter handles at registration. Enjoy!

Abhinav Shroff https://twitter.com/abhinavshroff
Ahmad Gohar https://twitter.com/ansgohar
aimee pi https://twitter.com/aimeepi
Akshaya Kapoor https://twitter.com/Akshaya_Kapoor
Alan Williams https://twitter.com/alandbsec
Alasdair Nottingham

Extending in-lists

A well known “limitation” of Oracle is that you can only have 1000 elements within an IN-LIST style expression in your SQL predicates. I use the quotes because I’ve always found that if you are heading into the territory where you need more than 1000 items in an IN-LIST, then it is often indicative of something else being wrong. For example, if the code is backing a user interface, then where in the design phase did someone not go “Whoa…we are going to have 1000 select-able elements on the screen?”

In any event, you can find many tricks and techniques out there on the intertubes about how workaround this issue, such as:

Speaker info for Perth, Australia

I have just got back from the Groundbreakers Latin America tour, and the travelling was made so much easier with the information provided by the organizers. So with the APAC tour coming up, I felt duty bound to give some hopefully useful information about my home town in Perth.

Flying in/out

There are two airport terminals in Perth. In times gone by, these were known as the Domestic and International terminals because, as the names suggest, domestic flights within Australia landed at one, and flights from overseas landed at the other. Hence locals will still refer to the terminals as “domestic” and “international”. However, due to all sorts of politics and bickering between airlines, times have changed.

My OpenWorld!

Just a couple of weeks away, and my oh my, I am going to be busy at OpenWorld this year!

Of course, first cab off the block will be the OpenWorld swim! It it September and marvellously warm in San Fran, so what better year to come along and meet new friends, and get free coffee and donuts! Just grab a towel from the hotel and head down to the marina!

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Register at the link below, so we know how many donuts to buy!!! Smile

A new use for DML error logging

Many moons ago I did a short video on the DML error logging feature in Oracle. The feature has been around for many years now, and is a great tool for capturing errors during a large load without losing all of the rows that successfully loaded. You can watch that video below if you’re new to DML error logging.

But here is a possible new use case for DML error logging, even if you are not doing large scale loads. Let me describe the problem first, and then show how DML error logging might be a solution.

I’ll create a table with a constraint on it’s column

DDL invalidates your SQL right ?

I stumbled upon this post by optimizer guru Nigel Bayliss last week, so please have a read of that first before proceeding. But I wanted to show a simple demo of how management of cursors continues to improve with each version of the database.

No more stale statistics in 19c

There is an odd contradiction that we all encounter for most databases, especially if they are predominantly used during the business day. Here is how that contradiction comes to be – it is in the way that we obtain and use optimizer  statistics on those databases. The contradiction runs like this:

  • To minimize service disruption, we gather statistics at a quiet time, for example, in the middle of the night
  • We then use those statistics during the business day whilst user activity is at its highest.
  • Highest user activity will typically mean the highest frequency of data changes.
  • Hence the statistics are at their peak accuracy when no-one is using them to optimize queries, and they are at their least accurate when everyone is using them to optimize queries!

We can demonstrate this easily with the following script run in 18c.

Plugzilla!

Cloning a pluggable database takes time, and for environments where you’d like to use clones as part of unit testing, or other elements of Agile development, it would be nice to be able to bring a clone into operation in the smallest time possible. One mechanism for that is sparse storage clones aka snapshot copy, but depending on your database version and your storage infrastructure, you might hit some limitations.

Enter …. Plugzilla! This PL/SQL package allows you clone pluggable databases extremely quickly by having pluggable database pre-cloned in advance.

Example

Lets say you have a development pluggable database called PDB1. You want to let developers take clones of this as quickly and as often as they like and at various stages in its life cycle. Here is how we might do it with plugzilla.

Autonomous Transaction Processing – your slice of the pie

I grabbed the following screen shot from a slide deck I’ve been giving about Autonomous Transaction Processing (ATP). It shows the services that are made available to you once you create your database. At first glance, it looks like we have a simple tier, where the lower in the tier you are, the smaller the slice of the database resource “pie” you get.

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