Uncategorized

Please keep your foreign keys

I came across an interesting blog post the other day about whether databases should be (declaratively) enforcing the foreign key relationships between tables.  The blog post discussed the issue of foreign keys being temporarily disabled to perform data loading, and then encountering the problem of what to do when those foreign keys cannot be re-enabled due to bad data.  Perhaps they should just be omitted altogether ?  I don’t want to put words in the author’s mouth, because he stressed he was not taking sides in the “should we” or “shouldn’t we” debate on declarative foreign keys, but the concluding part of the blog was:

Upgrade with no effort

We all know what upgrades mean.  Installation…Configuration…Patching…Testing…Deployment…Change approvals…Meetings…Long hours…Perhaps pulling an “overnighter” but hopefully never having to enact the dreaded “Backout Plan”.

Or…. that stuff can “just happen” without you worrying about it at all! 

I logged on to my Exadata Cloud Express database on the weekend, and lo and behold, it is not Oracle Database 12c anymore.  It is 12c Release 2 !

A look back through my email Inbox, and I saw that I had indeed been notified of the upcoming upgrade some time ago, but I was too lazy to pay attention to it Smile

Behold the full stack developer

Well…sort of.  Well…not really Smile

This blog post is really about how with just a little bit of knowledge and patience you can bring several cool technologies and tools together to achieve what you want.

I’m off to OpenWorld at the start of October which will be an awesome event as usual, and in the last few days, the session catalog has been released, detailing the topics and the scheduling for events throughout the OpenWorld conference.

12c Statistics on load–special cases

One of the cool features in 12c is the automatic collection of optimizer statistics when a table is either created or loaded via direct path from empty.  This makes a lot of sense because it saves us from what used to be the mandatory second step of gathering statistics whenever we loaded an empty table with data.

For example

11.2.0.4

Choosing a password scheme for the database

In the Security Guide there is a section to assist you with the decisions about what rules you might want to have in place when users choose passwords, namely attributes like the minimum length of a password, the types of characters it must (and must not) contain, re-use of old passwords etc etc. The documentation refers to a number of pre-supplied routines that are now available in 12c to assist administrators.  This is just a quick blog post to let you know that there is no “smoke and mirrors” going on here in terms of these functions. We’re implementing them in the same way that you might choose to build them yourself. In fact, you can readily take a look at exactly what the routines do because they are just simple PL/SQL code:

AskTOM–more experts to help you!

I’m thrilled to announce the “formal” addition of globalization and characterset guru Sergiusz Wolicki to the AskTOM team. I say “formal” addition because the team was already getting guidance from Sergiusz whenever we had tough question on charactersets, but just like his enthusiasm to help customers on the forums, Sergiusz was keen to help our AskTOM visitors as well.

Sergiusz is a 20+ year veteran of Oracle Corporation, with over half that time specializing in globalization, internationalization of Oracle products. It only takes a quick glance at the community space for Globalization to gauge the contribution he makes there !

Oracle Code … Not for database people ?

imageJump over to the Oracle Code home page and you will see the “mission statement” of the Oracle Code conference series:

“Learn from technical experts in sessions for developing software in Java, Node.js, and other languages and frameworks.”

Interval partitioning just got better

Interval partitioning was a great feature when it arrived in version 11, because we no longer had to worry so much about ensuring partitions were available for new data when it arrived.  Partitions would just be created on the fly as required.  I’m not going to talk about interval partition in detail because there’s plenty of good content already out there.  But one key element for interval partitioning is that the intervals have to start from somewhere, which is why you always have to define a table with at least one partition.

 

image

 

Quick tip–database link passwords

If you are relying on database links in your application, think carefully about how you want to manage the accounts that you connect with, in particular, when it comes to password expiry.

With a standard connect request to the database, if your password is going to expire soon, you will get some feedback on this:



SQL> conn demo/demo@np12
ERROR:
ORA-28002: the password will expire within 6 days


Connected.


But when using those same credentials via a database link, you will not get any warning, so when that password expires…you might be dead in the water.

In Memoriam – 2

This is the second of two items that my mother typed out more than 25 years ago. I had very mixed emotions when reading it but ultimately I felt that it was a reminder that, despite all the nasty incidents and stupid behaviour hyped up by the press and news outlets, people and organisations are generally kinder, gentler and more understanding than they were 60 years ago.

This story is about the birth of my brother who was born with a genetic flaw now known as Trisomy 21 though formerly known as Down’s syndrome or (colloquially, and no longer acceptably) mongolism. It is the latter term that my mother uses as it was the common term at the time of birth and at the time she typed her story.