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Multi-table insert

An interesting question came through on AskTom recently.  The requirement was to perform a single pass through a source table, and load the data into three target tables.

Now that’s trivially achieved with a multi-table insert, but there was a subtle “twist” on this requirement.  Each of the three target tables may already contain some, none or all of the rows from the source table.  Hence the requirement was to “fill in the blanks”.

So here’s a little demo of one way we could achieve this.

Apple Upset – upgrading to iPhone 7

Upgrading is always stressful – be it a computer, an Oracle database or an iPhone. There’s always a good chance for lost data and lost time dealing with complications.

So yesterday I picked up a new iPhone 7 from Verizon. The pickup was seamless. I had signed up for an upgrade program when I got the iPhone 6, so now I just walked in, gave them my old iPhone 6 and they gave me an new iPhone 7. It’s bit scary giving up my old phone before restoring to my new phone, but I had a backup AND I asked Verizon to please not wipe my iPhone 6 for 24  hours incase there were upgrade errors. They normally wipe the phone immediately.

The day was off to a good start. It only took about 10 minutes to get the phone and I had taken a full backup of my iPhone 6 the day before and thought I’d plug in , restore back up and wow, that would be easy.

A 12.2 treat for the festive season

We’re being asked to store more and more data, yet keep backup windows, query performance and the like unchanged, no matter how much we store. As a result, more and more database shops are needing to partition their data. The problem is – partitioning data is a significant restructure of the data, which thus incurs a large outage and the accompanying planning and coordination.

Unless you’re on 12.2.

Here’s a demo where we can take an existing table and

  • convert it to partitioned on a range scheme, also using intervals so we don’t need to worry about ongoing range creation maintenance, and
  • take one of the existing indexes, and convert it to a local index to mirror the table partitioning scheme, and
  • take the other existing index, and globally partition it.

Advanced Replication

Long before Streams, long before Goldengate, if you want to keep data between sites synchronised in some fashion, or even allow sites to independently update their data, there was the Advanced Replication facility in Oracle.  An “extension” of the concept of simple materialized views (or snapshots as they were called then), you could design complete replicated environments across Oracle databases.

But it was a non-trivial exercise to do this.  You had to be familiar with replication groups, replication objects, replication sites, master groups, master sites,  master definition sites, deferred transactions, quiescing, updatable materialized views, replication catalogs, conflict resolution…the list goes on an on.

Why does my full table scan take 10x longer today ?!

Every so often a DSS query that usually takes 10 minutes ends up taking over an hour.  (or one that takes an hour never seems to finish)

Why would this happen?

When investigating the DSS query, perhaps with wait event tracing,  one finds that the query which is doing full table scans and should be doing large multi-block reads and waiting for “db file scattered read” is instead waiting for single block reads, ie “db file sequential read”.  What the heck is going on?

Sequential reads during a  full table scan scattered read query is a classic sign of reading rollback and reading rollback can make that minute(s) full table scan take hours.

Amazon announces Performance Insights

Excited to see the announcement of Amazon RDS Performance Insight feature for database performance monitoring and tuning.

Having met the team for this project I can say from my personal view point that the importance and future success of this feature is clear as day to me. The team is awesomely sharp, the architecture is super impressive, and this is by far the most exciting performance monitoring and feedback system I’ve been involved with,  surpassing the work I’ve been involved in on Oracle’s performance monitoring and tuning system and Embarcadero’s DB Optimizer and Quest Foglight and Spotlight. Not only does the feature provide it’s own dashboard but will also provide an API to power your dashboards that already exist in the industry. I expect to see partners leveraging the API to provide new insights in their already existing database performance monitors.

SQL*PLus on Mac

I would think installing SQL*Plus on the Mac would be point, click download, point click, install bam it works.

Nah

It did install mostly straight forward on my old Mac. Got a new Mac and no dice.

Tried installing myself guessing at the downloads. First of all why isn’t there just one download?

Downloaded instantclient and instantclient with SQL*Plus which turns out to be correct, but no dice. Still got errors.

Got errors. Gave up.

Came back again to look at it yesterday and followed this:

https://tomeuwork.wordpress.com/2014/05/12/how-to-install-oracle-sqlplus-and-oracle-client-in-mac-os/

worked like a charm.

Then I ran a shell script that used SQL*Plus oramon.sh and get the error

max_enabled_roles – nice touch

Some people get very excited with roles, and quickly the number of roles proliferates to huge numbers…Until this happens

ORA-28031: maximum of 148 enabled roles exceeded

But in helping someone out on AskTom, I just found a nice touch in 11.2.0.4.  I had granted my account 200 roles (since the max_enabled_roles parameter is capped at 148), fully expecting to get the standard error when attempting to connect.  But I didn’t – all was fine.  You can see what is going on via the following demo.

Simple demo of message propagation

If you’re using AQ, then it’s simple to setup simple enqueue and dequeue facilities on your local database to provide all sorts of asynchronous style processing in your applications.  As long as you’re applications are designed and built to handle it, the “fire and forget” model to keep user applications responsive, and all of the “heavy lifting” done in the background is a very attractive one.

You can also use AQ to achieve the same concept across multiple databases, and the database will take care of propagating the messages from one database to the other.  Here’s a simple demo of that.

Something new about SQL Plan Directives and 12.2

SQL Plan Directives (SPD) remind me of bind peeking about 10 years ago, a nice feature on paper that worked fine most of the times but caused some major headache on those occasions when it didn’t. Luckily for bind peeking social media wasn’t that popular 10y ago so it took a while to “make a name” for a troublemaking feature, nowadays a couple of blog posts and many re-tweets to get pretty popular, poor SPD!
DISCLAIMER: I happen to like a lot both features and think positively of them, I just admit the “transparent” behavior was a little too ambitious </p />
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