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Getting the most out of in-memory

First of all … Happy New Year! This is my first post for 2020. Last year, I fell just short of 100 blog posts for the year – so this year, I’m starting early and hopefully I can crack the 100 mark! Anyway..onto the post.

The in-memory option in the Oracle database can yield some ridiculously good performance results. As someone who regularly gets to visit customers, it is always a feel good moment when you can take their data warehouse sample data and queries, which could be running in minutes or hours, slap on some in-memory parameters and watch the amazement when those queries might drop from hours to minutes, or minutes to seconds.

VirtualBox 6.1 : No compatible version of Vagrant yet! (or is there?)

VirtualBox 6.1 was released on the 11th of December and I totally missed it.

The downloads and changelog are in the usual places.

I spotted it this morning, downloaded it and installed in straight away. I had no installation dramas on Windows 10, macoS Catalina and Oracle Linux 7 hosts.

Unique all the things … including your pluggables

A quick tip just in time for Christmas Smile

I logged on to my database this morning, and things just didn’t look right. In fact, they looked down right alarming. All my objects were gone, my user account had the wrong password..It was almost as if I was connecting to a totally different database!

That’s because I was! Smile Here is how it happened:

Listener log data mining with SQL

If you take a look at the log files created by the listener, there is obviously a nice wealth of information in there. We get service updates, connections etc, all of which might be useful particularly in terms of auditing security

However, it also is in a fairly loose text format, which means ideally I’d like to utilise the power of SQL to mine the data.

dbca silent mode – Windows

Just a quick tip that often catches me out. If you are like me, you have long since tired of clicking Next, Next, Next, … through the GUI when you want to quickly create a database. Many people work around this by storing a set of database creation scripts. However, you can do even better. The Database Creation Assistant (dbca) can also be used at the command line and in silent mode.

On Windows, this is the error I commonly get when using dbca at the command line

Video : Oracle REST Data Services (ORDS) : RESTful Web Services Handling Media Files

In today’s video we take a look at RESTful web services handling media files built using Oracle REST Data Services (ORDS).

This is based on this article.

There is more information about related stuff here.

2019-what grabbed your attention

Here are the blog posts that you hit on most this year, with the most viewed entry on top. Unsurprisingly is it related to my bugbear with the OpenWorld catalog. I mean, every conference organizer must know that the one thing the attendees will always want is to get access to all of the content. Questions on UTL_FILE often come up on AskTOM, so it is unsurprising to see UTL_FILE pop up on the list.

Exadata storage indexes

We had a question on AskTOM inquiring about how to handle the issue of only 8 storage indexes being possible on an Exadata engineered system. If you are unfamiliar with what a storage index is, they are part of the suite of features often referred to as the “secret sauce” that can improve query performance on Exadata systems by holding more metadata about the data that is stored on disk. You can get an introduction to the concept of storage indexes here.

Video : Oracle REST Data Services (ORDS) : OAuth Authorization Code

In today’s video we look at the OAuth Authorization Code flow for Oracle REST Data Services.

This goes together with a previous video about first-party authentication here.

Both videos are based on parts of this article.

There are loads of other ORDS articles here.

Delphix XPP explained

This article was originally posted on the Delphix Support blog on 15-Nov 2015, but with the deprecation of the XPP feature with the new 6.0 release and higher, it was decided best to remove this article.

So, I have saved it and posted it here instead, almost 4 years to the day after it was originally posted…

The topic of converting Oracle databases from one of the proprietary
UNIX platforms (i.e. Solaris, AIX, or HP-UX) to Linux seems at first pretty
esoteric and far-fetched.

Meh. Right?

Plus, a lot of folks who have used Solaris, AIX, and HP-UX over the years can
argue that those operating systems have far more capabilities and
technical advantages than Linux, and they may be absolutely correct.  Who wants to get caught up in a religious debate?