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Upgrades

Case and Aggregate bug

The following description of a bug appeared on the Oracle Developer Community forum a little while ago – on an upgrade from 12c to 19c a query starting producing the wrong results on a simple call to the average() function. In fact it turned out to be a bug introduced in 12.2.0.1.

The owner of the thread posted a couple of zip files to build a test case – but I had to do a couple of edits, and change the nls_numeric_characters to ‘,.’ in order to get past a formatting error on a call to the to_timestamp() function. I’ve stripped the example to a minimum, and translated column name from German (which was presumably the source of the nls_numeric_characters issue) to make it easier to demonstrate and play with the bug.

Massive Deletes

One of the recurrent questions on the Oracle Developer Commuity forum is:

What’s the best way to delete millions of rows from a table?

There are an enormous number of relevant details that you need to know before you can give the “right” answer to this question, e.g.

Recursive WITH upgrade

There’s a notable change in the way the optimizer does cost and cardinality calculations for recursive subquery factoring that may make some of your execution plans change – with a massive impact on performance – as you upgrade to any version of Oracle from 12.2.0.1 onwards. The problem appeared in a question on the Oracle Developer Community forum a little while ago, with a demonstration script to model the issue.

I’ve copied the script – with a little editing – and reproduced the change in execution plan described by the OP. Here’s my copy of the script, with the insert statements that generate the data (all 1,580 of them) removed.

Drop Column bug

When I was a child I could get lost for hours in an encyclopedia because I’d be looking for one topic, and something in it would make me want to read another, and another, and …

The same thing happens with MOS (My  Oracle Support) – I search for something and the search result throws up a completely irrelvant item that looks much more interesting so I follow a hyperlink, which mentions a couple of other notes, and a couple of hours later I can’t remember what I had started looking for.

AW-argh

This is another of the blog notes that have been sitting around for several years – in this case since May 2014, based on a script I wrote a year earlier. It makes an important point about “inconsistency” of timing in the way that Oracle records statistics of work done. As a consequence of being first drafted in May 2014 the original examples showed AWR results from 10.2.0.5 and 11.2.0.4 – I’ve just run the same test on 19.3.0.0 to see if anything has changed.

 

LOB length

This note is a reminder combined with a warning about unexpected changes as you move from version to version. Since it involves LOBs (large objects) it may not be relevant for most people but since there’s a significant change in the default character set for the database as you move up to 18.3 (or maybe even as you move to 12.2) anyone using character LOBs may get a surprise.

Here’s a simple script that I’m first going to run on an instance of 11.2.0.4:

Upgrades – again

I’ve got a data set which I’ve recreated in 11.2.0.4 and 12.2.0.1.

I’ve generated stats on the data set, and the stats are identical.

I don’t have any indexes or extended stats, or SQL Plan directives or SQL Plan Profiles, or SQL Plan Baselines, or SQL Patches to worry about.

I’m joining two tables, and the join column on one table has a frequency histogram while the join column on the other table has a height-balanced histogram.  The histograms were created with estimate_percent => 100%. (which explains why I’ve got a height-balanced histogram in 12c rather than a hybrid histogram.)

Here are the two execution plans, 11.2.0.4 first, pulled from memory by dbms_xplan.display_cursor():

Upgrade threat

Here’s one I’ve just discovered while trying to build a reproducible test case – that didn’t reproduce because an internal algorithm has changed.

If you upgrade from 12c to 18c and have a number of hybrid histograms in place you may find that some execution plans change because of a change in the algorithm for producing hybrid histograms (and that’s not just if you happen to get the patch that fixes the top-frequency/hybrid bug relating to high values).

Here’s a little test to demonstrate how I wasted a couple of hours trying to solve the wrong problem – first a simple data set:

Random Upgrade

Here’s a problem that (probably) won’t affect the day to day running of most systems – but it could be a pain in the backside for people who write programs to generate repeatable test data. I’m not going to say much about the problem, just leave you with a test script.

Truncate upgrade

Connor McDonald produced a tweet yesterday linking to a short video he’d created about an enhancement to the truncate command in 12c. If you have referential integrity declared between a parent and child table then in 12c you can truncate the parent table and Oracle will truncate the child table for you – rather than raising an error. The feature requires the foreign key constraint to be declared “on delete cascade” – which is an option that I don’t see used very often. Unfortunately if you try to change an existing foreign key constraint to meet this requirement you’ll find that you can’t (yet) use the “alter table modify constraint” to make the necessary change. As Connor pointed out, you’ll have to drop and recreate the constraint – which leaves you open to bad data getting into the system or an outage while you do the drop and recreate.