Upgrades

12c Parse

Following on from a comment to a recent posting of mine about “bad” SQL ending up in the shared pool and the specific detail that too much bad SQL could cause contention problems while staying virtually invisible, there’s a related note today on the ODC (formerly OTN) forum of a little change in 12.2 that alerts you to the problem.

Try executing the following anonymous block (on a non-production system):

OFE

The title is a well-known shorthand for parameter optimizer_features_enable and it has been the topic of a recent blog post by Mike Dietrich in which he decries the practice of switching the parameter back to an older version on an upgrade (even though, as he points out, Oracle support has been known to recommend it and the manuals describe – though not with 100% accuracy – why you might do so).

I am one of the people who will suggest that on the upgrade a client should consider setting the optimizer_features_enable to the version just left behind as a strategy for getting to a newer version of the base code while minimising the threat of plan instability, so I’m going to play devil’s advocate in this case even though, as we shall see, I am nearly 100% in favour of Mike’s complaint.

dbms_sqldiag

If you’re familiar with SQL Profiles and SQL Baselines you may also know about SQL Patches – a feature that allows you to construct hints that you can attach to SQL statements at run-time without changing the code. Oracle 12c Release 2 introduces a couple of important changes to this feature:

  • It’s now official – the feature had been copied from package dbms_sqldiag_internal to package dbms_sqldiag.
  • The limitation of 500 characters has been removed from the hint text – it’s now a CLOB column.

H/T to Nigel Bayliss for including this detail in his presentation to the UKOUG last week, and pointing out that it’s also available for Standard Edition.

12.2 Partitions

At the end of my presentation to the UKOUG Database SIG yesterday I summed up (most) of points I’d made with a slide making the claim:

In 12.2 you can: Convert a simple table to partitioned with multi-column automatic list partitions, partially indexed, with read only segments, filtering out unwanted data, online in one operation.

 

Last night I decided I ought to demonstrate the claim – so here’s a little code, first creating a simple heap table:

Band Join 12c

One of the optimizer enhancements that appeared in 12.2 for SQL is the “band join”. that makes certain types of merge join much more  efficient.  Consider the following query (I’ll supply the SQL to create the demonstration at the end of the posting) which joins two tables of 10,000 rows each using a “between” predicate on a column which (just to make it easy to understand the size of the result set)  happens to be unique with sequential values though there’s no index or constraint in place:

Uniquely parallel

Here’s a surprising (to me) execution plan from 12.1.0.2 – parallel execution to find one row in a table using a unique scan of a unique index – produced by running the following script (data creation SQL to follow):

Accelerating Oracle E-Business Suites upgrades

Taking backups during development, testing, or upgrades

The process of upgrading an Oracle E-Business Suites (EBS) system is one requiring dozens or hundreds of steps. Think of it like rock climbing. Each handhold or foothold is analogous to one of the steps in the upgrade.

What happens if you miss a handhold or foothold?

If you are close to the ground, then the fall isn’t dangerous. You dust yourself off, take a deep breath, and then you just start climbing again.

But what happens if you’re 25 or 35 feet off the ground? Or higher?

Hinting

A posting on the OTN database forum a few days ago demonstrated an important problem with hinting – especially (though it didn’t come up in the thread)  in the face of upgrades. A simple query needed a couple of hints to produce the correct plan, but a slight change to the query seemed to result in Oracle ignoring the hints. The optimizer doesn’t ignore hints, of course, but there are many reasons why it might have appeared to so I created a little demonstration of the problem – starting with the following data set:

Upgrades

One of the questions that came up at the Optimizer Round Table this year was about minimizing the performance-related** hassle of upgrading from 11g to 12c. Dealing with changes in the optimizer is always an an interesting problem but in 12c this is made more challenging because of the automatic dynamic sampling that can introduce a significant amount of extra work at (hard) parse time, then generate SQL Directives, and finally generate extended (column group) statistics the next time you (or the automatic job) collect stats.

Closure

It’s been a long time since I said anything interesting about transitive closure in Oracle, the mechanism by which Oracle can infer that if a = b and b = c then a = c but only (in Oracle’s case) if one of a, b, or c is a literal constant rather than a column. So with that quick reminder in place, here’s an example of optimizer mechanics to worry you. It’s not actually a demonstration of transitive closure coming into play, but I wanted to remind you of the logic to set the scene.