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iggy_fernandez

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Personal information

Full name
Iggy Fernandez
My blog
http://www.toadworld.com/members/iggy_5f00_fernandez/blogs
My bio

My name is Ignatius. Everyone calls me Iggy. My name means “fiery” (the Latin word for fire is ignis and the Sanskrit word for fire is agni). I grew up in the same town as Freddie Mercury and in the same country as Engelbert Humperdinck; that’s your clue. I now live in Northern California, in the San Francisco Bay Area.

In my day job, I specialize in SQL performance tuning and database performance tuning. I serve as the editor of the NoCOUG Journal, the quarterly publication of the Northern California Oracle Users Group, the longest-running Oracle Database users group in the world. I sing tenor for the Pacific Masterworks Chorus in Dublin, California under the direction of James Toland (here we are singing Home, Sweet Home by James Bishop).

I have a lot of opinions but am willing to change them when confronted with fresh facts. As the American philosopher Ralph Waldo Emerson said in his essay on self-reliance: “A foolish consistency is the hobgoblin of little minds, adored by little statesmen and philosophers and divines. … speak what you think to-day in words as hard as cannon-balls, and tomorrow speak what tomorrow thinks in hard words again, though it contradict every thing you said to-day.” My opinion about NoSQL is that it put performance, scalability, and reliability front and center but lost the opportunity to take the relational model to the next level because—just like the RDBMS vendors—it mistakenly believed that normalization dictates physical storage choices, that non-relational APIs are forbidden by the relational model, and that relational is synonymous with ACID (Atomicity, Consistency, Isolation, and Durability). Further, since the NoSQL “innovations”—functional segmentation, sharding, replication, eventual consistency, and schemaless design—are compatible with the relational model, they will eventually be absorbed by mainstream database management systems. (More )

Location

San Francisco
United States